Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarhub.balamand.edu.lb/handle/uob/5327
Title: Experimental study of bulletproof concrete
Authors: Tawk, Issam 
Semaani, Eddy
Aouad, Georges 
Affiliations: Department of Mechanical Engineering 
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering 
Keywords: Bulletproof
Carbon fibers
Concrete
Impact
Issue Date: 2022
Publisher: Taylor & Francis Online
Part of: Journal of Adhesion Science and Technology
Start page: 1
End page: 13
Abstract: 
This paper focuses on the study of composite concrete specimen’s resistance under an impact of AK-47 bullet with an estimated projectile’s speed of 715 m/s, and energy of 2019 J. Two sets of samples (a total of nine samples) are fabricated and tested from mortar with 1 cm steel fibers or 1 cm carbon fibers respectively. Tensile and compression tests are applied for the first set of samples, to investigate the effect of steel and carbon fibers on the strength of the specimens. Two ratios (1% and 2%) of fibers per mortar mass are also experienced before assessing the bullet resistance. For the second set of samples, three different composite sandwich configurations are tested with a rear impact test. An Armox-® 500 T plate is applied in front of mortar panels for two configurations. Results show that the addition of carbon and steel fibers to concrete panels enhances the impact resistance of concrete by keeping the panels coherent and preventing them from breaking into fragments, reducing crater diameters and detached mass. The three proposed configurations of sandwiches panels stopped the full perforation of the bullet.
URI: https://scholarhub.balamand.edu.lb/handle/uob/5327
ISSN: 01694243
DOI: 10.1080/01694243.2021.1978224
Ezproxy URL: Link to full text
Type: Journal Article
Appears in Collections:Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
Department of Mechanical Engineering

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