Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarhub.balamand.edu.lb/handle/uob/2431
Title: Pressure relief in prosthetic sockets through hole implementation using different materials
Authors: Nehme, Gabi 
Affiliations: Department of Mechanical Engineering 
Keywords: Patellar tendon
Distal tibia
Prosthetic sockets
Relief areas
Hole implementation
Issue Date: 2015
Part of: International journal of materials and metallurgical engineering
Volume: 9
Issue: 9
Start page: 1118
End page: 1122
Abstract: 
Below-knee amputees commonly experience asymmetrical gait patterns. It is generally believed that ischemia is related to the formation of pressure sores due to uneven distribution of forces. Micro-vascular responses can reveal local malnutrition. Changes in local skin blood supply under various external loading conditions have been studied for a number of years. Radionuclide clearance, photo-plethysmography, trans-cutaneous oxygen tension along with other studies showed that the blood supply would be influenced by the epidermal forces, and the rate and the amount of blood supply would decrease with increased epidermal loads being shear forces or normal forces. Several cases of socket designs were investigated using Finite Element Model (FEM) and Design of Experiment (DOE) to increase flexibility and minimize the pressure at the limb/socket interface using ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) and polyamide 6 (PA6) or Duraform. The pressure reliefs at designated areas where reducing thickness is involved are seen to be critical in determination of amputees comfort and are very important to clinical applications. Implementing a hole between the Patellar Tendon (PT) and Distal Tibia (DT) would decrease stiffness and increase prosthesis range of motion where flexibility is needed. In addition, displacement and prosthetic energy storage increased without compromising mechanical efficiency and prosthetic design integrity.
URI: https://scholarhub.balamand.edu.lb/handle/uob/2431
Open URL: Link to full text
Type: Journal Article
Appears in Collections:Department of Mechanical Engineering

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