Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarhub.balamand.edu.lb/handle/uob/7320
Title: The Association between Lifestyle Factors and COVID-19: Findings from Qatar Biobank
Authors: Akbar, Zoha
Kunhipurayil, Hasna H
Saliba, Jessica 
Ahmad, Jamil
Al-Mansoori, Layla
Al-Khatib, Hebah A
Al Thani, Asmaa A
Shi, Zumin
Shaito, Abdullah A
Affiliations: Department of Public Health 
Keywords: COVID-19
Bariatric surgery
Dietary patterns
Obesity
Smoking
Vitamin D
Issue Date: 2024-04-03
Publisher: MDPI
Part of: Nutrients
Volume: 16
Issue: 7
Abstract: 
Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) manifestations range from mild to severe life-threatening symptoms, including death. COVID-19 susceptibility has been associated with various factors, but studies in Qatar are limited. The objective of this study was to investigate the correlation between COVID-19 susceptibility and various sociodemographic and lifestyle factors, including age, gender, body mass index, smoking status, education level, dietary patterns, supplement usage, physical activity, a history of bariatric surgery, diabetes, and hypertension. We utilized logistic regression to analyze these associations, using the data of 10,000 adult participants, aged from 18 to 79, from Qatar Biobank. In total, 10.5% (n = 1045) of the participants had COVID-19. Compared to non-smokers, current and ex-smokers had lower odds of having COVID-19 (odds ratio [OR] = 0.55; 95% CI: 0.44-0.68 and OR = 0.70; 95% CI: 0.57-0.86, respectively). Vitamin D supplement use was associated with an 18% reduction in the likelihood of contracting COVID-19 (OR = 0.82; 95% CI: 0.69-0.97). Obesity (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2), a history of bariatric surgery, and higher adherence to the modern dietary pattern-characterized by the consumption of foods high in saturated fat and refined carbohydrates-were positively associated with COVID-19. Our findings indicate that adopting a healthy lifestyle may be helpful in the prevention of COVID-19 infection.
URI: https://scholarhub.balamand.edu.lb/handle/uob/7320
DOI: 10.3390/nu16071037
Open URL: Link to full text
Type: Journal Article
Appears in Collections:Department of Public Health

Show full item record

Record view(s)

33
checked on May 25, 2024

Google ScholarTM

Check

Dimensions Altmetric

Dimensions Altmetric


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.