Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarhub.balamand.edu.lb/handle/uob/7043
Title: Optimization of polyethylene teraphtalate [sic] terephthalate content in mortar using Taguchi method
Authors: Fayad, Tony
Advisors: Assaad, Joseph 
Keywords: PET, Light weight mortar, SBR-Latex, Compressive strength, Flexural Strength, Bond strength, Workability
Subjects: Polyethylene terephthalate
Taguchi methods (quality control)
Mortar--Additives
University of Balamand--Dissertations
Dissertations, Academic
Issue Date: 2023
Abstract: 
This study aimed to investigate the impact of PET (polyethylene terephthalate) content in concrete mixes, specifically in mortar, and to optimize the mix using the Taguchi method. Nine mixes, including PET and additives such as SBR-Latex, were examined, along with three control mixes. The effects of these materials on the workability and hardened properties of the mortar, including flexural and compressive strength and water absorption, were studied. The results revealed that the addition of PET to the mix increased workability, an essential characteristic for ensuring easy handling and application of the mortar. However, the hardened properties of the mortar, such as flexural and compressive strength and water absorption, were decreased. To address these limitations, SBR was added to the mix, which improved the performance of the mortar. Overall, this study highlights the potential benefits and drawbacks of using PET in mortar and suggests that the inclusion of SBR may help overcome some of this material's limitations. The Taguchi method was used to optimize the mix, which allowed for a more efficient and effective approach to evaluating the impact of different materials on the mortar's properties. These findings may be valuable for researchers and professionals in the construction industry seeking to improve the performance and durability of mortar mixes.
Description: 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 52-59)
URI: https://scholarhub.balamand.edu.lb/handle/uob/7043
Rights: This object is protected by copyright, and is made available here for research and educational purposes. Permission to reuse, publish, or reproduce the object beyond the personal and educational use exceptions must be obtained from the copyright holder
Type: Thesis
Appears in Collections:UOB Theses and Projects

Show full item record

Record view(s)

27
checked on Jun 20, 2024

Google ScholarTM

Check


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.