Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarhub.balamand.edu.lb/handle/uob/4185
Title: Investigating the effect of native-LDL and oxidized-LDL on peripheral T cell-mediated immune responses in patients with stable angina pectoris
Authors: Abou Samra, Elias
Advisors: Karam, Marc 
Subjects: Atherosclerosis
Cytokines--Immunology
Issue Date: 2011
Abstract: 
Oxidized and native low-density lipoproteins (ox-LDL, n-LDL) are instrumental factors in atherogenesis; however, their effect on immunoregulation in stable stages of coronary syndrome is still unclear. CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells and Th17 cells, a new subset of T-helper cells, play an important role in peripheral immunity. Their imbalance leads to the development of tissue inflammation and autoimmune diseases. Few studies have explored the effect of ox-LDL and n-LDL on altering the balance between T-reg and Th17 cells. In order to increase our understanding about the regulatory mechanism underlying Th17/T-reg cells, we examined the frequencies of T-reg cells with its relevant secreted cytokine interleukin-10. We measured also the levels of interleukin-6 known to act as an inducer signal for Th17 responses, and interleukin-17 levels the signature cytokine of Th17 cells from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of patients with stable angina (SA) and normal coronary artery (NCA) groups. The addition of ox-LDL and n-LDL on both patients and control cells lead to an anergy or hyporesponsivness effect in T-regulatory and Th17 responses. We suggest that this effect of peripheral cellular tolerance would be altered under the influence of a definite cytokine milieu that can shift the immune system dramatically to an inflammatory or even to an anti-inflammatory response depending on the cytokines nature and lipoproteins concentration that can exist in the cell culture media.
Description: 
Includes bibliographical references (p.45-54).

Supervised by Dr. Marc Karam.
URI: https://scholarhub.balamand.edu.lb/handle/uob/4185
Rights: This object is protected by copyright, and is made available here for research and educational purposes. Permission to reuse, publish, or reproduce the object beyond the personal and educational use exceptions must be obtained from the copyright holder
Ezproxy URL: Link to full text
Type: Thesis
Appears in Collections:UOB Theses and Projects

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