Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarhub.balamand.edu.lb/handle/uob/2326
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dc.contributor.authorMardini, Patricken_US
dc.contributor.authorAli, Nabil Alen_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-23T09:11:01Z-
dc.date.available2020-12-23T09:11:01Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarhub.balamand.edu.lb/handle/uob/2326-
dc.description.abstractThis paper shows that oil price and the U.S. stock market are associated in a long-run relationship. However, this linkage has the ability to reverse itself, and the regime prevailing after the structural change is not transitory—it may last a decade or more. A novel time series representing the number of barrels of oil needed to purchase the S&P500 is generated. Unit root tests and the cointegrating regression identify the presence of a structural change in the data occurring during the Asian crisis. Results suggest that new oil supply dynamics and a switch in the demand metrics would perform radical changes to the way stock markets and oil prices interact.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.subjectOil pricesen_US
dc.subjectStructural Changeen_US
dc.subject.lcshStocksen_US
dc.titleOil price and the U.S. stock market: a change in the long-run relationen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationDepartment of Economicsen_US
dc.description.volume16en_US
dc.description.issue2en_US
dc.description.startpage15en_US
dc.description.endpage24en_US
dc.date.catalogued2017-12-04-
dc.description.statusPublisheden_US
dc.identifier.OlibID175360-
dc.relation.ispartoftextReview of business researchen_US
dc.provenance.recordsourceOliben_US
crisitem.author.parentorgFaculty of Business and Management-
Appears in Collections:Department of Economics
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